Lay Summaries
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Our lay summaries are an abridged version of the team’s published papers, written in a coherent and non-technical language. The aim of these summaries is to explain the scientific concepts and results produced by the group to those who do not have prior knowledge of the subject, whether that be fellow academics working in unrelated fields or general members of the public.


2017
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August

Controlled Core-to-Core Photo-Polymerisation – Fabrication of an Optical Fibre-Based pH Sensor

F. Mohamad, M.G. Tanner, D. Choudhury, T.R. Choudhary, H.A. C. Wood, K. Harrington, and M. Bradley

[Coming soon]

Read more here

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Ballistic and Snake Photon Imaging for Locating Optical Endomicroscopy Fibres

M.G. Tanner, T.R. Choudhary, T.H. Craven, B. Mills, M. Bradley, R.K. Henderson, K. Dhaliwal, and R. R. Thomson

We have demonstrated a camera capable of seeing through the human body. Only slightly more bulky than the sci-fi concept of X-ray specs, this camera has been used to determine the location of light sources deep inside tissue. The goal is to enable clinicians to locate medical devices, such as fibre optic endoscopes inserted into the body, without having to resort to harmful and inconvenient traditional X-rays.

Read more here


May

Characterisation and Modelling of Inter-Core Coupling in Coherent Fibre Bundles

A. Perperidis, H.E. Parker, A. Karam-Eldaly, Y. Altmann, K. Dhaliwal, R.R. Thomson, M.G. Tanner, and S. McLaughlin

Coherent fibre bundles are optic fibres that transmit images from one end to the other and can be used to see inside the body. Our paper looks at an effect called inter-core coupling, which reduces overall imaging quality and can be seen in all fibre bundles. We discuss a method that can quantify this effect.

Read more here
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Time-resolved spectroscopy at 19,000 lines per second using a CMOS SPAD line array enables advanced biophotonics applications

A. Kufcsák, A. Erdogan, R. Walker, K. Ehrlich, M. Tanner, A. Megia-Fernandez, E. Scholefield, P. Emanuel, K. Dhaliwal, M. Bradley, R. K. Henderson, and N. Krstajić

This paper shows the unique properties of light detectors designed in our group, and the improved performance they provide in various different biomedical applications. Our main focus was using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy to demonstrate the detector capabilities

Read more here
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April

Highly selective and rapidly activatable fluorogenic Thrombin sensors and application in human lung tissue

A. Megia-Fernandez, B. Mills, C. Michels, S.V. Chankeshwara, K. Dhaliwal and M. Bradley

The title of this paper means finding a synthetic compound than can be “turned on” as a fluorescent signal when the enzyme Thrombin is present in tissue. The synthetic compound is not affected by the presence of other enzymes. This is useful because high levels of Thrombin are related to certain diseases that can appear in the human lung, and therefore these compounds could allow for better diagnosis.

Read more here

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Low index contrast imaging fibres

J.M. Stone, H.A C. Wood, K.Harrington and T.A. Birks

The title of this paper means that we have made imaging fibres that use glass with a lower concentration of impurities (dopants) in the light guiding regions than found in typical imaging fibres. Different concentrations of impurities give different refractive indices in the glass, and it is this difference that is responsible for confining the light within optical fibres.

Read more here
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March

Fibre optic time-resolved spectroscopy using CMOS-SPAD arrays

K. Ehrlich, A. Kufcsák, N. Krstajić, R.K. Henderson, R.R. Thomson and M. G. Tanner

The title of this paper means using an optical fibre to collect the light emitted from specific chemical substances called fluorophores and to transport the light to an instrument which is equipped with a special sensor to collect spectral information of the emitted light as well as the arrival time of the light at the sensor.

Read more here

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February

Quantitative characterisation of endoscopic imaging fibres

H. Wood, K. Harrington, J. M. Stone, T. A. Birks, and J. C. Knight

The title of this paper means assigning a number to the performance of imaging fibres thin enough to image within the human body. We detail a technique that uses an interference pattern (light and dark vertical lines) as a standard to be imaged by the test fibre.

Read more here